APM Unveils Black Sea Port Design

 10 Jan 2019 10.34am

APM Terminals Poti and Poti New Terminals Consortium have submitted a conceptual design for a first stage construction for the expansion of the Poti Sea Port, Georgia, according to a statement.

The project plan entails a 14.5-meter water depth at the 700-meter quay wall and 25 hectares of dedicated land for the bulk operation yard and covered storage facilities for various cargo types.

The Poti Sea Port is the largest in Georgia and accounts for 80% of the country’s container traffic and the vast majority of its bulk cargo.

The current multi-purpose facility has 15 berths, a total quay length of 2,900 meters, more than 20 quay cranes and 17 km of rail track.

According to APM Terminals, the project will directly create an estimated 250 new jobs for the local population and over 900 employment opportunities in related industries and services.

Royal Haskoning recently wrote a Port Technology technical paper on smart port development

The terminal operator also claims that new facilities in Poti will support the growth of international trade through the Georgian transit corridor.

 

Credit: APM Terminals

 

Speaking about the proposed expansion, Klaus Laursen, Managing Director of APM Terminals Poti, had this to say: “After high-level and in-depth negotiations with authorities, cargo owners, equity partners and financial institutions we concluded that Poti will continue as the prime access to the Caucasus and the Central Asian markets.

“We believe that we have the skills, ability and expertise to contribute to the economy of Georgia by persisting in our journey to further develop the Poti Sea Port.

"Poti Sea Port, owned and managed by APM Terminals, has a well-established market position. Based on the existing infrastructure in and around Poti it offers a strong platform for continued growth.

“With the introduction of modern technology, we are confident that Poti will remain the most effective and efficient logistical solution for our existing and future customers”. 

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