Technical Papers - Automation and Optimisation

Safer, Faster and Cheaper Port Stays: The Sea Traffic Management Validation Project

  PTI Edition 76 - Cyber Risk & Security

The Sea Traffic Management Validati on (STM) project will contribute to a safer, more efficient and environmentally friendly mariti me sector by developing services based on informati on shared by mariti me stakeholders which is updated in real time. The STM concept is a shared informati on environment with the underlying rati onale that bett er overall decisions can be taken which will in turn result in increased effi ciency and improved safety. The STM led by the Swedish Mariti me Administration, has a total budget of approximately US$50.5 million, of which is 50% co-financed by the EU transport fund Connecti ng Europe Facility/Motorways of the Sea and covers the period 2015-2018. More than 50 partners from 13 countries are involved in the project. The project will demonstrate the STM concept by using it in two large-scale test beds: one in the Nordic and one in the Mediterranean Seas. The test beds encompass around 300 vessels, 13 ports and fi ve shore-based service centres.

  Automation and Optimisation, VTMIS & Aids to Navigation (ATON)


How to Reduce Opex Costs for RTG Terminals

  PTI Edition 76 - Cyber Risk & Security

Conventional Rubber Tyred Gantry cranes (RTGs) consume 2 to 2.5 liter diesel per container move. Consequently a container terminal with a throughput of 1 million TEU consumes 2 million to 2.5 million liters of diesel per year. This drives many operators to look for suitable power supply alternatives for this type of crane, in order to reduce diesel consumption and thus emissions. Conductix-Wampfler has been converting RTGs into electrified RTGs (E-RTGs) since 2006. The converting process involves shutting down the diesel genset and powering the RTG with electric power directly from the power grid. E-RTGs typically use 2.5 to 3.5 kWh electrical power per container move.

  Automation and Optimisation, Dredging and Coastal Development, Environment, Health & Safety


Automated Stacking Cranes In Port Terminals

  PTI Edition 76 - Cyber Risk & Security

Shipping containers revolutionized the movement of goods, driving change and efficiency throughout the global supply chain. The next revolution in container handling is the application of automation to container terminal operation. At this time there are multiple automated container terminals in operation, and more in development globally. The challenge has been to automate operations in the part of the terminal where the containers are stacked, called the block. On one end of the block services, the ships are being loaded and unloaded, and on the other end, services trucks and trains being loaded and unloaded. A typical layout is shown in Figure 1. Stacks are usually five containers high with a narrow space between the rows, and there are typically eight rows of containers per section, stretching for up to a quarter mile, or around 400 metres. The sections are duplicated, providing parallel sections.

  Automation and Optimisation


Using Intelligent TOS Plug-Ins to Increase Terminal Performance

  PTI Edition 76 - Cyber Risk & Security

As volumes have found their way up again, and additional terminal capacity is not easily realized, terminals return to seeking improvements in their internal processes. Based on our experience, which covers over 50 terminals where we assisted in performance improvement programs, it is possible to make substantial performance gains for internal processes. This is also recognized by the terminals themselves. A recent survey by Navis indicates that 76% of the respondents put process improvement as a ‘number one priority’ for terminal operations. Process improvements may be seen through productivity increases, gains in service levels, for example the reliability of port stay, capacity enhancement due to using space more effectively, and cost reductions. Without a doubt, double digit improvements can be attained in the performance-cost index.

  Automation and Optimisation, Container Handling, Terminal Logistics


Open Interfaces: Standardizing Terminal Automation

  PTI Edition 76 - Cyber Risk & Security

Across the globe, container terminal automation is advancing rapidly. Automation, including the insights learned from the data it produces, is almost universally recognized as the future of improved container handling productivity, safety and business performance. However, when compared with other fields (such as the automotive manufacturing or process industries), automation in the container handling business is still in its relative infancy. This has meant that until recently, most terminal automation systems have been based on extensive integration of various subsystems and solutions, rather than conceived as complete end-to-end automation systems such as those in other industries.

  Automation and Optimisation


Machine Learning in Container Terminals

  PTI Edition 76 - Cyber Risk & Security

With many new opportunities emerging from the current wave of digitalization throughout global logistics chains, terminal planning and management need to be revisited with a data-driven perspective. The amount of operational data, such as from a terminal operating system (TOS), together with data from a variety of new data sources, such as sensors and mobile technologies, is growing fast but for the most part remains to a considerable extent too under-analyzed to be of real value. Meanwhile, many current projects and initiatives in the port industry indicate a growing interest in data analytics solutions. One example of applying data analytics is the SAFER project of the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (MPA). Under the project, MPA has piloted three IBM analytics-based modules to improve the management of Singapore's growing vessel traffic. Another example is the Navis ATOM Labs, which is investigating the use of Machine Learning (ML) for the optimization and automation of terminal operations. In this technical paper, we provide a brief overview of potential applications of ML in container terminals and discuss some relevant challenges.

  Automation and Optimisation


Smartlog: Piloting Blockchain for Logistics

  PTI Edition 76 - Cyber Risk & Security

The SmartLog is a blockchain-enabled pilot project aiming to reduce overall cargo unit transport times in accordance with the EU’s targets for road, rail, air and water transport networks in the Baltic/North Sea region. These improvements are being made under its Trans-European Transport Networks (TEN-T) programme. SmartLog’s testing for the proof of concept began in June, 2017 in Muuga Harbour at the Port of Tallinn, the largest container harbour in Estonia. The project will connect some of the individual operators’ port management systems together with the blockchain solution. This is predicted to bring local operators greater awareness on how their performance ties in with the larger context of port operations, and give them solid insight into how to improve their interactions so that Tallinn Port benefits from the increases in speed and cost savings.

  Automation and Optimisation, Security, Surveillance and Detection



Tecnoport2025: Building the IoT-Connected Future in the Port of Seville

  PTI Edition 76 - Cyber Risk & Security

The Port of Seville is the only inland seaport in Spain. It is a core port within the Trans-European Transport Networks (TEN-T), being part of the Mediterranean Corridor. It is located on the 80 kilometre Guadalquivir EuroWay waterway that runs from Seville to the coast and forms part of the TEN-T. But the Port of Seville is also an important logistics hub that serves a population of over one million people, maintaining a dominant position in certain logistic corridors, especially in the Madrid-Seville-Canary Islands corridor. Being an inland port facilitates cargo access to the city of Seville and the surrounding area, but it also introduces some major problems related to the navigability in the estuary, as the shallow depth of the waterway limits the size of vessls calling at the port.

  Automation and Optimisation, Port Focus


GPS Tracking: A Smart Way to Track and Trace Goods

  PTI Edition 76 - Cyber Risk & Security

There are many types of ‘smart’ containers or ‘e-containers’ on the market which can be tracked to provide real-time data on their movements. The tracking and tracing of containers and trailers is no longer a choice, but a necessity. This applies to commercial supply chains, as well as to the transportation of military or diplomatic cargo.

  Automation and Optimisation, Supply Chain


Evolving Cybersecurity: How Ocean Container Shipping Can Prepare

  PTI Edition 76 - Cyber Risk & Security

Digitization has brought many great benefits, but it has also enabled a new form of crime: cybercrime. It’s in the news, seemingly daily. Equifax, one of the three largest creditreporting agencies, suffered a breach that may impact more than 143 million consumers. The US Securities and Exchange Commission experienced a software vulnerability that, according to reports, provided a potential basis for illicit stock gains through its EDGAR system. In another high-profile incident, hackers injected a multi-stage malware program into Avast’s CCleaner, a software security program, in what appears to be a targeted attack on some of the world’s largest technology companies in an effort to steal intellectual property.

  Automation and Optimisation, Security, Surveillance and Detection


IoT for Spare Parts Tracking and Security in Ports

  PTI Edition 76 - Cyber Risk & Security

The ports and container terminals industry is under increasing pressure from growing volumes of trade, aging work forces, limited real estate availability, supply chain integration, regulatory requirements and capital management needs, to name a few. As an infrastructure-rich industry, ports and container terminals must continually manage their critical assets over their lifecycle to remain competitive to the global market. This means that effectively managing these assets is now more a high-profile activity than ever before. Businesses must have strong frameworks and tools to ensure success in operating in these challenging and dynamic environments.

  Automation and Optimisation, Security, Surveillance and Detection


Using IoT to Combat Smuggling and Theft in Containerized Transport

  PTI Edition 76 - Cyber Risk & Security

International supply chains are extended and complex. Many logistics service providers have tight margins and limited visibility in the end-to-end success of a shipment. The sheer volume of containers moving around the world creates opportunities for smugglers and counterfeiters. Theft of goods is an obvious problem, but quality loss, socalled shrinkage, or waste due to containers being breached, is less noticeable. For some commodities, a lack of supply chain integrity can result in the loss of sales as buyers of goods only pay for products on arrival due to the risk of damage or loss in the supply chain. Regardless of their role, all supply chain actors have a common interest in preventing delays arising from theft and smuggling through emerging Internet of Things (IoT) technology for the port container sector.

  Automation and Optimisation, Security, Surveillance and Detection


Using Secure IoT for Efficient Smart Port Operations

  PTI Edition 76 - Cyber Risk & Security

Digitization and Internet of Things (IoT) technologies are powerful enablers that forward-thinking port operators are using in order to improve efficiencies, better manage traffic, empower their workforces to increase throughput, and decrease carbon emissions while making traffic safer. One such operator is the Hamburg Port Authority (HPA), which manages Europe's third largest port.

  Automation and Optimisation, Terminal Logistics


Manila International Container Terminal: Implementing the Terminal Appointment Booking System (TABS)

  PTI Edition 75 - Mega-Ports & Mega-Terminals

The Manila International Container Terminal (MICT), the flagship operation of global port operator International Container Terminal Services (ICTSI), continues to perform optimally through the first half of 2017 as the terminal gears up for the peak season in the latter part of the year.

  Automation and Optimisation, Terminal Logistics


A New Maritime Operating System

  PTI Edition 75 - Mega-Ports & Mega-Terminals

When Port Technology’s Container Terminal Automation Conference drew to a close in April, 2017 two key discussion themes that had emerged from many presenters and delegates were disruption and collaboration: Disruption to business models and collaboration between stakeholders across the supply chain. Both are seen to be critical in keeping the marine industry moving forward.

  Automation and Optimisation