Technical Papers

Evolving an Offering

  Edition 73 - The Automation, Training & Simulation Issue     Port Focus,Port Planning, Design & Construction,Container Handling,Terminal Logistics,Port Focus,Port Planning & Finance,Automation and Optimisation,Automation and Optimisation,Terminal Focus,Carriers

Only 36% of ports and terminals claim to have seen increased pressure from shipping lines in terms of the importance placed on automation and digitisation. However, the survey results certainly suggest that shipping lines do value new technologies: half of the vessel stakeholders surveyed feel ports and terminals are immature in adopting Smart technologies.

Key Trends And Developments

  Edition 73 - The Automation, Training & Simulation Issue     Port Focus,Port Planning, Design & Construction,Container Handling,Port Focus,Port Planning & Finance,Automation and Optimisation,Automation and Optimisation,Shipping

The year 2016 brought a range of challenges and opportunities for European ports. This paper intends to summarize the main developments in nine distinctive themes.

Virtual Reality The Next Evolution in Operator Training

  Edition 73 - The Automation, Training & Simulation Issue     Port Focus,Port Planning, Design & Construction,Container Handling,Port Focus,Port Planning & Finance,Automation and Optimisation,Automation and Optimisation,Port & Maritime Training,Simulation Training,Port & Maritime Training

A VR training system brings four primary advantages; cost effectiveness, field of view, parallax, and depth perception. Traditional simulators use projectors or flat panel displays to provide a view into the virtual world.

The Digitalisation Megatrend

  Edition 73 - The Automation, Training & Simulation Issue     Port Planning, Design & Construction,Global Terminal Operators,Port Planning & Finance,Automation and Optimisation,Automation and Optimisation,Shipping

Digitising complete supply chains and automating information exchange could form a solution to this problem [2]. In order to overcome current information exchange barriers research is currently being undertaken on the translation of the internet to the real-world.

Brexit's Impact on Customs Regulation

  Edition 73 - The Automation, Training & Simulation Issue     Finance,Global Issues,Port Planning & Finance,Automation and Optimisation,Automation and Optimisation

This article looks first at the current position, and in particular the significance for businesses (both importers and exporters) of the UK's membership of the customs union. The article then considers the impact if the UK were no longer a member of the customs union, and highlights some of the issues which may have an impact on UK ports.

2016 Update: Dry Bulk Terminal Capacity Planning

  Edition 72 - The Journal of Ports & Terminals - Top 30 Technical Papers 2014-2016     Terminal Logistics,Dry Bulk & Specialist Cargo Handling,Global Terminal Operators,Port Planning & Finance,Dry Bulk and Specialist Cargo Handling,Terminal Focus,Shipping

In 2012, the international seaborne trade for dry bulk cargo continued to grow: an overall growth of 5.7 percent, within which was a 7.2 percent increase rate for major bulks. Unlike other types of terminals (e.g. container terminals, general cargo terminals), for dry bulk terminals it is important to distinguish if they are export or import terminals. Because of the differences in objectives (i.e. export or import dry bulks), an export bulk terminal is designed rather differently from an import bulk terminal

2016 Update: Automation Fails, But Can Win Big

  Edition 72 - The Journal of Ports & Terminals - Top 30 Technical Papers 2014-2016     Port Focus,Port Planning, Design & Construction,Container Handling,Terminal Logistics,Global Terminal Operators,Port Planning & Finance,Container Handling,Mega Ship Ready,Automation and Optimisation,Mega Ship Ready,Automation and Optimisation,Shipping,Container Weighing

With the increase in vessel sizes, terminal operators have finally realised that they will no longer be able to handle mega-ships in an efficient and economical manner without some level of automation. Some operators have sought to meet this challenge by ‘automating’ specific portions of their operations; adding CCD-TV, GPS devices, sensors and automatic steering to RTG cranes and straddle carriers


2016 Update: Ports of the Future

  Edition 72 - The Journal of Ports & Terminals - Top 30 Technical Papers 2014-2016     Port Focus,Port Planning, Design & Construction,Terminal Logistics,Port Focus,Port Planning & Finance,Terminal Focus,Shipping

For the port of the future, bigger vessels, broader carrier alliances, container capacity consolidation and larger hub and spoke port networks will be changing costs and revolutionising the way in which profits are generated from operations. Simultaneously, the port of the future will manage increased investment along with demands for improved productivity and higher level of service

2016 Update: Automated Container Terminal Planning

  Edition 72 - The Journal of Ports & Terminals - Top 30 Technical Papers 2014-2016     Port Focus,Port Planning, Design & Construction,Port Focus,Port Planning & Finance,Automation and Optimisation,Automation and Optimisation

What does an “automated” marine container terminal look like in 2016? Straddle carriers and RTGs can be automated but these are rarely used as the backbone for an automated terminal due to lack of densityor poor performance from a rubber tyred interface compared with steel wheels running on a steel rail.

2016 Update: SmartPort: Information in Your Hands

  Edition 72 - The Journal of Ports & Terminals - Top 30 Technical Papers 2014-2016     Port Planning, Design & Construction,Port Planning & Finance

In recent decades, ports have been going through a continuous transition of becoming more open to their communities. They have evolved from being civil works managers to service providers, and this transformation has led to more and more information being exchanged between the port and its environment. Thus, port authorities began to exchange information electronically with their partners, first using electronic data interchange (EDI), and later implementing port community systems (PCS). With the development of the internet, ports also started to publish information on their websites, first static data and subsequently dynamic information, creating a communication channel with its environment that is firmly consolidated. This opening up process has affected the interaction with ports’ business partners, like ship agents, terminals, shipping lines etc. and also the relationship with its local community. A vast number of ports are located in the vicinity or heart of cities. This fact has meant that the opening up of the ports has needed to respond to pressure from citizens wanting to know about the port as a part of their home city. In this spirit, a lot of port-city integration projects have been developed all around the globe.

2016 Update: Maritime Sector Logistics 4.0

  Edition 72 - The Journal of Ports & Terminals - Top 30 Technical Papers 2014-2016     Port Focus,Port Planning, Design & Construction,Environment, Health & Safety,Global Issues,Port Planning & Finance,Automation and Optimisation,Mega Ship Ready,Automation and Optimisation

The steam engine. Electricity. Automation. The Internet of Things: these 4 terms describe the evolution of industrial progress in roughly the last 2 eras. The Internet of Things – also addressed as the fourth wave in industrial development, or as the ‘digitisation’ of industry – offers various opportunities to the port sector.

2016 Update: The New Era of Mega-Ports

  Edition 72 - The Journal of Ports & Terminals - Top 30 Technical Papers 2014-2016     Port Focus,Port Planning, Design & Construction,Container Handling,Terminal Logistics,Port Focus,Port Planning & Finance,Mega Ship Ready,Mega Ship Ready,Shipping

Ports have been ever-present throughout human civilisation, yet only in recent times have we witnessed the emergence of mega-ports. Mega-ports can be considered truly indispensable nodes of the current globalised economic system. But what are mega-ports, who needs them, how does a port become one of them, and should we be glad about them; these are the questions that this paper seeks to address

2016 Update: Handling Mega-Ships

  Edition 72 - The Journal of Ports & Terminals - Top 30 Technical Papers 2014-2016     Port Planning, Design & Construction,Container Handling,Terminal Logistics,Port Planning & Finance,Container Handling,Mega Ship Ready,Mega Ship Ready,Shipping

Bigger ships mean more moves per call, which in turn means a logical requirement for additional berth capacity, or so conventional wisdom would state. This article contends that upgrading berth capacity alone in order to tackle mega-ships will lead to congestion throughout yard facilities. I believe that additional capacity can be achieved whilst avoiding the spectre of congestion by improving the efficiency of each quay crane at a berth and by increasing the number of quay cranes on one ship

2016 Update: Container Weight Verification: Opportunities and Challenges

  Edition 72 - The Journal of Ports & Terminals - Top 30 Technical Papers 2014-2016     Port Planning, Design & Construction,Container Handling,Port Planning & Finance,Container Handling

The process within the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) to implement the mandatory verification of a container weight before it is loaded on to a vessel is progressing as expected. In a May 2014 meeting, the Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) approved draft amendments to SOLAS (the International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea) chapter VI to require the mandatory verification of the gross mass of containers, either by weighing a packed container, or by weighing all packages and cargo items and adding the tare mass. The requirements are expected to enter into force in July 2016. It is clearly stated in the draft amendment that the responsibility for obtaining and documenting the container weight lies with the shipper. This means that the burden to comply with the new regulations is not with terminal operators as such, but the situation - where many shippers will not have access to the facilities needed to fulfill their duties - provides terminal operators with an opportunity to offer such a service to shippers.

2016 Update: Singapore's Next Gen Mega-Port

  Edition 72 - The Journal of Ports & Terminals - Top 30 Technical Papers 2014-2016     Port Focus,Port Planning, Design & Construction,Environment, Health & Safety,Global Issues,Port Focus,Port Planning & Finance,Automation and Optimisation,Mega Ship Ready,Automation and Optimisation

The port industry is a very dynamic industry. The modern Port of Singapore, being a forward-looking mega-port, is a good demonstration of how dynamic the port sector is. Singapore was established as an independent and sovereign republic in 1965. 2015 marks the country’s fiftieth anniversary, and within a relatively short time span of less than 50 years, the case of Singapore shows the development of a port from almost nothing back in the 1960s to the largest transhipment hub in the world today.