Union Review Delays Metro Vancouver Eco-Plan

 17 Feb 2016     Container Handling, Containers, Environment , Ports

Due to a judicial review launched by truckers union Unifor on behalf of truck drivers working at Port Metro Vancouver, the port has announced that it is postponing the date when the next phase of its environmental requirements take effect for container trucks.

The postponement may allow Port Metro Vancouver to set a new implementation date that could be better aligned with the start of the June 1, 2016 annual renewal date of the provincial licenses.

Subject to the outcome of the judicial review, Port Metro Vancouver plans to implement a 10-year rolling truck age requirement by January 1, 2022.

All container trucks approved are to serve the port to meet the increasingly stringent environmental standards through January 1, 2017.

The environmental requirements through 2017 are in line with the Northwest Ports Clean Air Strategy, a partnership of Port Metro Vancouver and the ports of Seattle and Tacoma, with support from Environment Canada and Metro Vancouver, among other government representatives.

Trucks with engine and exhaust systems older than 2007 need to either be retrofitted to meet a 2007 approximate equivalent matter emission limit, or be upgraded to a 2010 or newer truck that meets 2010 emissions limits.

Unifor has sought judicial review of Port Metro Vancouver’s rolling 10-Year ‘Truck Age Policy’, including its environmental requirements.

Peter Xotta, Vice President of Operation and Planning at Port Metro Vancouver, said: “Port Metro Vancouver remains committed to implementing increasing environmental requirements as part of our mandate to protect the environment.

“However, asking drivers to invest in replacement trucks or suitable retrofits before the conclusion of the judicial review, and before they know whether they will continue to be licensed by the provincial commissioner, are sensible reasons to postpone the deadline.”

Xotta concluded: “We know that heavy duty diesel trucks with newer engine and exhaust systems are far cleaner than their older counterparts so it’s critical we get old trucks off the port for the sake of local communities.”