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HHLA Optimizes Cargo Transport Through the Night

HHLA Optimizes Cargo Transport Through the Night

CTD Container-Transport-Dienst, a subsidiary of terminal operator Hamburger Hafen und Logistik AG (HHLA), is alleviating traffic in areas surrounding the Port of Hamburg by conducting more journeys at night.

For containers which are being moved between depots and container terminals around Hamburg, the short distances involved often mean transport is conducted by trucks.

As a result of traffic volume and the subsequent pressure this places on port infrastructure, especially at peak times, CTD has now opted to transport the majority of its cargo throughout the night.

 

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Out of the 50,000 containers that CTD trucks transhipped last year, more than 20,000 were moved at night, helping to decrease the strain of transport on Hamburg and its local community.

Steven Treder, team leader for local transportation at CTD, commented: “In our planning, we try to schedule as many trips as possible during the night shift. This ensures a more even utilisation of our vehicle fleet while also increasing capacities during the day.”

A further statement from HHLA also emphasized that trucks will spend less time waiting in traffic as a result of these new measures, making transport planning more reliable and offering increased protection to the environment.

Gerald Hirt, Managing Director of HVCC, discusses Hamburg terminals in a recent Port Technology technical paper

Other strategies that have been implemented to solve the issue of congestion include transporting more containers via inland waterways and rail networks.

The establishment of a new rail connection between Hamburg and Bremerhaven, which CTD has operated with fellow HHLA subsidiary Metrans since the end of 2018, has so far replaced almost 300 journeys by truck.

 

 

Ralph Frankenstein, Managing Director of CTD, said: “We are not committing to one particular mode of transport.

“If a customer requests transportation by rail and subsequent delivery by truck, they will be offered these services from a single source.”

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