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GPA to Establish Megaship Trade Hub

GPA to Establish Megaship Trade Hub

The Georgia Ports Authority (GPA) has unveiled a new Big Ship/Big Berth programme that will enable the Port of Savannah to service six 14,000 TEU megaships simultaneously.

Savannah’s Garden City Terminal is currently able to handle two of these larger vessels at one time, a number that is set to increase to three by April 2019.

Speaking at the Georgia Free Trade Conference, GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch said: “No other single container terminal in North America has the ability to expand berth capacity at this rate.

Ed McCarthy, Georgia Ports Authority, discusses the Garden City Terminal in a recent Port Technology technical paper

The importance of the Big Ship/Big Berth project, expected to conclude by 2024, has been demonstrated in January 2019 by a 28% year-on-year increase in container throughput volume, emphasizing the need for further capacity and expanded operations.

 

 

Jimmy Allgood, GPA Board Chairman, commented: “A strong global economy coupled with a growing awareness of Savannah’s logistical advantages are driving sustained growth at our deepwater container terminal.

“GPA’s Big Berth/Big Ship program will ensure Georgia stays ahead of demand and ahead of the competition.”

In the next five years before the programme is completed, the GPA plans to implement a new fleet of 21 Neo-Panamax ship-to-shore cranes, replacing 14 of its older machines to complement upgraded docks at the Port of Savannah.

 

 

The authority is also scheduled to boost the number of rubber-tired gantry (RTG) cranes operating at Garden City Terminal to 158, as well as commencing projects to expand the facility’s harbour and rail capacity.

In addition to this, the last 12 months has seen private investors add 9 million square feet to the port area, bringing Savannah’s total industrial real estate market to 60.6 million square feet.

Griff Lynch added: “These advancements are necessary to handle tremendous customer demand at our terminals.”

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