Hamburg Sees Huge Jump in Atlantic Trade

 22 May 2019 09.50am

The Port of Hamburg, the third biggest port in Europe and the 17th in the world, saw its TEU grow by 6.4% in the first quarter of 2019, according to its latest financial results.

In a statement accompanying its results, the Port of Hamburg credited its spike in throughput to four new liner services that link it to the US, Canada and Mexico.

A closer look at the figures shows a fourfold jump in trade with the US since the second quarter of 2018, which makes it the second biggest market behind China.

The Port also saw feeder traffic and hinterland traffic increase by 8%, and it said the “supreme efficiency” of the automated HHLA Container Terminal Altenwerder (CTA) was a big advantage.

 

Axel Mattern, Thilo Trusch and Ingo Egloff Credit: Port of Hamburg 

Thilo Trusch, Hapag-Lloyd’s Head of Trade Management Atlantic, emphasizes the importance of the Atlantic trade to the Port: “As a rule, we offer our customers at least two sailings on our Atlantic liner services from HHLA Container Terminal Altenwerder (CTA).

A recent Port Technology technical paper looked at the Port of Hamburg as 5G testing ground

“In Hamburg we are also pooling our feeder services and exploiting the advantages of the excellent hinterland infrastructure with around 2,100 container train services per week,” 

Axel Mattern, Joint CEO of Port of Hamburg Marketing, went further and emphasised how important the Atlantic is for the Port: “The four new Transatlantic services run by ‘THE Allianz’ plus renewed growth in bulk cargo handling are putting the port on a growth path.

“Hamburg has now become the hub for services with the USA, Mexico and Canada.”

Ingo Egloff, on the Executive Board at Port of Hamburg Marketing, also commented: “The positive figures for seaport-hinterland services and the transhipment field underline Hamburg’s outstanding position as a hub port.

“More than 100 liner services link Hamburg with more than 1,000 seaports worldwide and generate the throughput volumes that then pass inland via Hamburg for further distribution.”

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